Teens and Teeth

Teens and Teeth

This is that time of development when children are finding their own identities and personalities .A confused state mentally, physically and emotionally is a general norm.

A pleasing healthy smile thus becomes more important to the teens than any other stage of development.

The bottom line for smiles that are healthy on the inside and out:

- Always brush your teeth twice a day with fluoride toothpaste for two minutes.
- Floss between your teeth daily.
- Avoid sugary and starchy snacks.
- Wear a mouthguard when you’re active on the playground.
- Don’t smoke.
- Don’t pierce your lips or any part of your mouth.

The IDA recommends that you visit your dentist for a happy and healthy smile.

Concerns Unique to Teens

Crooked Teeth and Braces

Looking good is really important in teenage years as the self esteem and confidence is developing at this age.It is very important for an adolescent to feel good about him/herself.

Crooked Teeth and Braces

Never underestimate the value of a beautiful smile. Your smile is one of the most important reflections of your individual personality. It allows you to assert emotions of happiness and joy. It communicates affection and expresses your cheerful feelings. Unfortunately there are many people who, because of crooked teeth or misaligned jaws, face a lifetime of feeling unattractive, suppressing the natural urge to smile. Crowded or crooked teeth are also difficult to clean and maintain. This may contribute to conditions that cause tooth decay, gum disease and eventual tooth loss. These problems can be avoided by straightening the teeth through orthodontic treatment.

Crooked Teeth and Braces

Braces can help improve your smile and make your teeth straighter. They can also improve your dental health and overall health because untreated orthodontic problems can make it hard to bite and chew and can interfere with eating. If you have a bad bite, you may also be prone to cavities or gum disease because it may be hard to clean your teeth. Braces come in many different styles, including tooth-colored plastic braces or traditional metal braces that come in a variety of colors.

Crooked Teeth and Braces

Removable clear retainers can sometimes be used. Talk to your dentist to see what the best choice is for you.

Crooked Teeth and Braces

Orthodontics is a specialist form of dentistry, which aims to straighten the teeth to produce a healthier bite. Although more and more adults are having braces, the majority of patients are in their teens.

Crooked Teeth and Braces

Treatment usually lasts around 18 months, although it will depend on the type of brace fitted and how much treatment is needed. Your orthodontist will explain your course of treatment to you and what you will need to do to keep your brace clean. Although you will have regular check- ups with your orthodontist, it will be up to you to look after your brace on a day-to-day basis.

Crooked Teeth and Braces

Fixed braces are often referred to as 'train track' braces. The orthodontist attaches metal or tooth- coloured brackets - small blocks - to the teeth and then runs a special wire over the brackets to pull the teeth into the right position. Because the brackets are stuck to the teeth, you won't be able to take the brace off during your treatment.

When the brace is first fitted, it may feel strange and possibly uncomfortable. Because the brackets are raised, they may rub against the inside of your lips or cheeks. Your orthodontist will give you some special wax to prevent this rubbing which should make it more comfortable. You may also find that, for the first few days, your jaw aches because of the pressure of the brace. If this is the case, you may find a painkiller helps - the sort of thing you might take for a headache will be fine. If the discomfort lasts longer than a few days, though, you may wish to go back to your orthodontist, who can then readjust the brace. Although you'll still be able to eat most of the foods you were eating before, you will need to take care not to damage your brace.

There are some foods that you'll need to cut out altogether though:

- Toffees
- Chewy sweets, like marshmallows and Turkish Delight
- Hard foods, like crusty bread
- With other foods, like apples, you might need to cut them up, but you'll still be able to eat them.

Because your brace provides food with more places to hide, you'll need to be extra careful with your hygiene routine. Brushing your teeth twice a day with a fluoride toothpaste is essential, and you may also find using a fluoride mouthwash last thing at night is helpful to protect your teeth while you sleep. If you don't look after your teeth while you're wearing your brace, they may become permanently stained.

As well as the brace itself, your orthodontist may attach elastic bands to it to increase the pressure on certain teeth.

Crooked Teeth and Braces

Some brace wearers customize their braces with colored elastics.

Once the brace is taken off, you will need to wear a retainer brace, which is removable.

Retainers
Crooked Teeth and Braces

Once your fixed braces have been removed, you will need to wear a retainer to make sure the teeth don't move back to their original position. You'll probably need to wear the retainer for around six months - all the time at first, and then probably just at night. Your orthodontist will tell you when you can make this change - don't be tempted to reduce your wear of the retainer yourself, as this could have an impact on your treatment.

IDA recommends that brushing your teeth twice a day with a fluoride toothpaste and keeping your diet healthy is important whether you wear a retainer or not, but you should be especially aware of cutting down on sugary snacks and fizzy drinks, as these may case more damage to your teeth while you are wearing your retainer. You should take your retainer off when you brush your teeth but make sure you give it a clean too to get rid of any old food. If you are using your toothbrush, though, do be careful not to damage the retainer.

Crooked Teeth and Braces

 Crooked Teeth and Braces

Mouthguards

"Better to be safe than sorry"

Mouthguards are a "plastic" appliance, clear or coloured, worn over the upper teeth.

Mouthguards

They shield the teeth in an impact situation by providing a cushion which gives protection when the jaws are driven hard together. The Indian Dental Association recommends a good mouthguard should be of sufficient thickness in the correct areas, resilient, well retained, comfortable, and should not interfere with speaking and breathing.

Mouthguards
 Mouthguards

 Mouthguards The IDA recommends the following:
  1. Always wear a mouthguard when playing contact sports
  2. A properly fitted, custom made mouthguard offers the best protection
  3. Ask your dentist about the best mouthguard for you.
REMEMBER a broken tooth is damaged for LIFE

The time to visit your dentist is NOW.

Dental Emergencies

"Better to be safe than sorry"

Mouthguards are a "plastic" appliance, clear or coloured, worn over the upper teeth.

DentalEmergencies

They shield the teeth in an impact situation by providing a cushion which gives protection when the jaws are driven hard together. The Indian Dental Association recommends a good mouthguard should be of sufficient thickness in the correct areas, resilient, well retained, comfortable, and should not interfere with speaking and breathing.

DentalEmergencies
 DentalEmergencies

 DentalEmergencies The IDA recommends the following:
  1. Always wear a mouthguard when playing contact sports
  2. A properly fitted, custom made mouthguard offers the best protection
  3. Ask your dentist about the best mouthguard for you.
REMEMBER a broken tooth is damaged for LIFE

The time to visit your dentist is NOW.

Erosion

Erosion is the loss of the surface of the tooth - especially enamel -that is caused by acid attack. This is different from bacterial acid attack that we call tooth decay. Enamel is the hard outer surface of the tooth seen when we smile and it protects the sensitive dentine underneath. Erosion of the enamel can lead to exposure of the dentine, which may lead to pain and sensitivity with cold foods and drinks.

Erosion

Erosion is a slow process that people generally do not become aware of until significant enamel is already lost. Erosion often shows up as hollows on the top surface of the molar teeth or the teeth seem to become smaller or thinner as the enamel erodes away. As the enamel wears away exposing the underlying dentine the teeth may appear a darker yellow colour -the colour of the dentine- and sensitivity to hot, cold or acidic foods and drinks may become noticeable.

Erosion

How to prevent dental erosion?

The IDA recommends:

  1. Limit the number of times each day you eat and drink acid foods and drinks - this reduces the number of acid attacks on your teeth

  2. Erosion
  3. Don't hold your drinks in the mouth or swish the drinks around your mouth
  4. Finish your meals with cheese or a milk drink as this will help to neutralize the dietary acids
  5. If you eat or drink anything acidic, wait for about one hour before brushing your teeth. Brushing straight after acidic foods and drinks may cause even more enamel damage.
The time to visit your dentist is NOW.

Oral Piercing

Teenagers love to experiment with new fashion fads.At times to rebel,at times under peer pressure they may choose to do things which may not be entirely healthy or safe.

Oral piercing is one such fad.
 OralPiercing

 OralPiercing

 OralPiercing

Many who consider oral piercing do not realize the side effects that could occur to them. Health problems can arise from the procedure and the long term use of the jewellery. The wound created by piercing can increase your risk of oral infections, bleeding, and can even increase your risk for the transmission of certain diseases. There is also a chance that the oral bacteria can enter the blood stream through the wound created during the procedure and can increase the risk for developing endocarditis in people who have underlying heart problems.

Also people with oral piercing - especially tongue piercing - have greater risk of developing gum disease than others without oral piercing. They can lead to tooth wear and chipping of the teeth. They can damage old fillings and can cause difficulty eating and speaking clearly.

The IDA recommends that before you plan to get an oral piercing done,discuss the same in detail with your dentist.

The time to visit your dentist is NOW.

Smoking / Tobacco

Smoking/Tobacco
 Smoking/Tobacco
Smoking/Tobacco

Smoking/any form of oral tobacco is bad for your health including oral health. It is easy to see the effects of these on your teeth.

Tobacco can cause:

1: Tooth Staining
 Smoking/Tobacco
 Smoking/Tobacco

 2: Persistent bad breath
 Smoking/Tobacco
 3: Reduced sense of taste and smell

4: Accumulation of calculus (tartar)

Smoking/Tobacco

 5: Gum disease
Smoking/Tobacco

6: Tooth loss

7: Oral cancer

Smoking reduces blood flow to the gums, depriving them of oxygen and nutrients that allow gums to stay healthy, and leaving them vulnerable to bacterial infection. Smokers also exhibit delayed healing after dental procedures. Smokers are more likely to develop gum disease than non- smokers and gum disease is the most common causes of tooth loss in adults.

Smoking can also increase your risk of developing Mouth and throat cancer.

Smoking/Tobacco

 Smoking/Tobacco

 8: Lung cancer
Smoking/Tobacco

 9: Mouth sores or lesion that do not heal.

10: Heart disease and/or stroke.

11: Chronic bronchitis.
 Smoking/Tobacco

Passive smoking is as harmful as smoking.

Smoking/Tobacco
Quitting
Smoking/Tobacco

is the only way to decrease your risk of these and other tobacco-related health problems. The addictive quality of nicotine, which is found in cigarettes, cigars and chewing tobacco, can make this especially difficult. That’s why it’s important to have a plan and a support network.

Smoking/Tobacco
 Smoking/Tobacco
 Smoking/Tobacco

Ask people to help you stick to your plan. Write down your reasons for quitting.

The IDA recommends you to take professional help.

The time to visit your dentist is NOW.

Methmouth

A moment of fun can lead to a lifetime of pain.

Trying drugs for fun,impressing friends or as a getaway from stress can lead to serious trouble.

Meth Mouth, a term for the damage caused by the use of the illegal and highly addictive drug methamphetamine, is one of many devastating effects this drug can have on users’ oral health. Methamphetamine is a potent central nervous system stimulant that can cause shortness of breath, hyperthermia, nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, irregular heart beat, high blood pressure, permanent brain damage and rampant tooth decay. Some users describe their teeth as “blackened, stained, rotting, crumbling or falling apart.” Often, the teeth cannot be salvaged and must be removed.

Methmouth

 Methmouth

 Methmouth

 Methmouth

 The time to visit your dentist is NOW.

Eating Disorders

Eating disorders are conditions defined by abnormal eating habits that may involve either insufficient or excessive food intake to the detriment of an individual's physical and mental health.

Eating disorders arise from a variety of complex physical, emotional and social issues. Serious eating disorders like anorexia, bulimia and binge eating can also affect a person’s oral health.

How do eating disorders affect teeth and gums?

Without the proper nutrition, gums and other soft tissue inside the mouth may bleed easily. The glands that produce saliva may swell and individuals may experience chronic dry mouth. Throwing up frequently can affect teeth too. That’s because when strong stomach acid repeatedly flows over teeth, the tooth’s enamel can be lost to the point that the teeth change in color, shape and length. The edges of teeth become thin and break off easily.

The IDA recommends that if you suffer from an eating disorder, it’s important to seek counseling and talk to your health care provider.

Eating Disorders

 Eating Disorders

 Eating Disorders

 Eating Disorders

Treatments for eating disorders usually involve psychotherapy, nutrition education, family counseling, medications and hospitalization.

The time to visit your dentist is NOW.

WisdomTeeth

WisdomTeeth

Wisdom teeth, also referred to as third molars, get their name by being the last teeth to come in during young adulthood, the time of life when you gain maturity or “wisdom.” The majority of people have most of their permanent teeth by age 13. Your wisdom teeth should come into your mouth between the ages of 17-21. Sometimes they do not have enough room to come in normally or are in the wrong position to come straight up. When that happens, your dentist may refer to them as impacted and they may have to be removed.

WisdomTeeth

Not everyone’s teeth develop on the same schedule. That’s why it’s important to see your dentist regularly so he or she can monitor the progress of your wisdom teeth. Every patient is unique, but in general, wisdom teeth may need to be removed when there is evidence of changes in the mouth such as:

WisdomTeeth
  • Pain
  • Infection
  • Cysts
  • Tumors
  • Damage to adjacent teeth
  • Gum disease
  • Tooth decay (if it is not possible or desirable to restore the tooth)
WisdomTeeth

WisdomTeeth

Your dentist or specialist may also recommend removing your wisdom teeth to prevent problems or for others reasons, such as when removal is part of getting braces, treating gums or other dental procedures.

The IDA recommends that you regularly visit your dentist to avoid pain and complications due to third molar eruption.The time to visit your dentist is NOW.

Bad Breadth

Man is a social animal,and his greatest aim in life is to be loved,accepted and respected by society.He can only achieve this by coming in close contact with different people,and interacting with them.At times,issues like body odour,bad breadth,lack of personal hygiene may come in the way .Bad breadth is one of the most common,and often neglected part of personal grooming .Though it may seem like a small problem,it sometimes leads to deeper problems like intimacy issues in couples.

What causes bad breath?

Food :What you eat affects the air you exhale, like garlic or onions. If you don't brush and floss daily, particles of food can remain in the mouth, collecting bacteria, which can cause bad breath. Dieters may develop unpleasant breath from infrequent eating.

Gum disease :Persistent bad breath or a bad taste in the mouth can also be one of the warning signs of gum disease; which is caused by plaque.

Dry mouth :This occurs when the flow of saliva decreases and can be caused by various medications, salivary gland problems or continuously breathing through the mouth. Without enough saliva, food particles are not cleaned away. If you suffer from dry mouth, your dentist may prescribe an artificial saliva, or suggest using sugarless candy or increase your fluid intake.

Smoking and tobacco :In addition to staining teeth and being bad for overall health, tobacco can add to bad breath. Tobacco reduces your ability to taste foods and irritates gum tissues. Tobacco users are more likely to suffer from gum disease and are at greater risk for developing oral cancer. If you use tobacco, ask your dentist for tips on kicking the habit.

Medical conditions :Some diseases have symptoms related to bad breath. Sinus or lung infections, bronchitis, diabetes, and some liver or kidney diseases may be associated with bad breath

Bad Breath

Having bad breath can have a drastic effect on your social life - not to mention your love life. But don't panic - it's usually very easy to sort out. Bad breath is mostly caused by strong smelling food or drink, smoking or not brushing your teeth properly.

Bad Breath

The IDA recommends that if you want to keep your breath - and your mouth - nice and fresh, you need to make sure you're brushing properly, using a fluoride toothpaste and a toothbrush with a small head. This will let you get into all the nooks and crannies in your mouth and help you get rid of all the old bits of food and bacteria that might be lurking there. Use small circular motions with the brush and don't forget to brush the backs of the teeth and your tongue, as bacteria can hide here too.

Bad Breath

If you're worried that your breath smells, don't be tempted to just suck on a mint and hope the problem goes away. Most mints are full of sugar and what that will do is feed the bacteria already in your mouth and make the problem worse. If you can't get to a toothbrush and toothpaste, try chewing some sugar-free gum. This will stimulate the saliva in your mouth, which can then help flight the bacteria.

Bad Breath

Bad Breath

Bad Breath

The time to visit your dentist is NOW.

Leukoplakia

Leukoplakia are thick, whitish-color patches that form on the inside of the cheeks, gums or tongue, these patches are caused by excess cell growth and are common among tobacco users. They can result from irritations such as an ill-fitting denture or the habit of chewing on the inside of the cheek. Sometimes leukoplakia is associated with oral cancer. Your dentist may recommend a biopsy if the patch appears threatening.

Causes of leukoplakia can include:
  • Irritation from rough teeth, fillings, or crowns, or ill-fitting dentures that rub against your cheek or gum
  • Chronic smoking, pipe smoking, or other tobacco use
  • Sun exposure to the lips
  • Oral cancer (although rare)
  • HIV or AIDS
  • What Are the Symptoms of Leukoplakia?

The presence of white or gray colored patches on your tongue, gums, roof of your mouth, or the inside of the cheeks of your mouth may be a sign of leukoplakia. The patch may have developed slowly over weeks to months and be thick, slightly raised, and may eventually take on a hardened and rough texture. It usually is painless, but may be sensitive to touch, heat, spicy foods, or other irritation.

Leukoplakia

Leukoplakia

Your dentist will examine the lesion and checks the biopsy results to help determine how to manage the disease. Treatment begins with removing the factors that contribute to the lesion: quitting tobacco or replacing ill-fitting dentures or bridges.

What Is the Treatment for Leukoplakia?

Treatment for leukoplakia, if needed, involves removing the source of irritation. For example, if leukoplakia is caused by a rough tooth or an irregular surface on a denture or a filling, the tooth will be smoothed and dental appliances repaired. If leukoplakia is caused by smoking, you will be asked to minimize or stop smoking or using other tobacco products.

Leukoplakia is usually harmless, and lesions usually clear in a few weeks or months after the source of irritation is removed. If eliminating the source of irritation is ineffective in reducing leukoplakia, the lesion may need to be surgically removed. The lesion can be removed either by your general dentist or by an oral surgeon.

Hairy leukoplakia requires treatment with an antiviral medication.

The time to visit your dentist is NOW.